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Learn to Read, Read to Learn

Posted By Arkansas Learns, Friday, October 6, 2017
Updated: Friday, October 6, 2017

59%.

That's the percentage of Arkansas students, grades 3 through 10, who did not meet the readiness benchmark for reading on the 2016-17 ACT Aspire. It's 70% for eleventh graders, per the ACT.

The good news? It was 61% in 2015-16.

The bad news? At the current growth rate, it will take just over twenty years to ensure all Arkansas students are ready in reading.

In Arkansas's school districts, reading readiness ranges from 65% at Valley View to 9% at Dollarway.

In Arkansas's open-enrollment public charter schools, reading readiness ranges from 89% at Haas Hall Academies in both Fayetteville and Bentonville to 4% at SIA Tech, a graduation recovery school in Little Rock.

There is hope. Thanks to the advocacy of educators like Audie Alumbaugh and Kim Head, supported by thousands of literacy-focused parents and educators, including many in the dyslexia movement, Arkansas's governmental leaders are embracing and advancing a culture of reading.

With the passage of Act 416, sponsored by Senator Alan Clark in the 91st General Assembly, any person applying for an elementary education K-6 teaching license of a special education K-12 teaching license now must successfully pass a stand-alone reading test and multi-subject test as a condition of licensure.

In short, new teachers must know how to teach the science of reading.

Additionally, the Arkansas Department of Education launched R.I.S.E. (Reading Initiative for Student Excellence) Arkansas. According to the ADE's website, the initiative "encourages a culture of reading by coordinating a statewide reading campaign with community partners, parents and teachers to establish the importance of reading in homes, schools, and communities."

For the first time since 2013-14, Arkansas has had two years of the same summative test (ACT Aspire and ACT) in order to determine gains/declines in academic readiness. Here are the results for reading:

Arkansas  2015-16
Tested 
2015-16
Ready 
2016-17
Tested 
2016-17
Ready 
Grade Gain/
Decline 
Class Gain/
Decline 
ACT Aspire            
 3rd  37,695  35%  37,773  37%  +2  
 4th  35,169  41%  37,720  43%  +2  +8
 5th  35,212  34%  35,147  35%  -1  -6
 6th  35,229  46%  35,112  47%  +1  +13
 7th  35,345  37%  35,397  38%  +1  -8
 8th  35,866  48%  35,219  49%  +1  +12
 9th  36,207  36%  36,405  40%  +4  -8
 10th  34,637  34%  34,598  37%  +1  +1
 Arkansas
 Grades 3-10
 285,360  39%  287,371  41%  +2  
ACT             
 11th  30,956  31%  30,640  30%  -1  

Sources:
ACT Aspire http://www.officeforeducationpolicy.org/arkansas-school-data-act-aspire
ACT http://www.officeforeducationpolicy.org/act-ap

Here's the over-simplified divide:

Whole Language: a method of teaching children to read at an early age that allows students to select their own reading matter and that emphasizes the use and recognition of words in everyday contexts.

In other words, if you've never seen the word, you have no tools to decode it.

Phonics (Science of Reading): a method of teaching people to read by correlating sounds with letters or groups of letters in an alphabetic writing system.

In other words, even if you've never seen the word, you have the tools to decode it.

The light bulb on this issue for those of us who learned to read in 1960s Arkansas was that how we learned to read (i.e. phonics) was/is not being taught. Most egregiously, teachers have long emerged from our college, university and non-traditional teacher preparation programs trained in Whole Language instead of Phonics/Science of Reading.

Subsequently, most of our children and grandchildren were taught in a way with which we were/remain unfamiliar, and therefore we were/are not able to help reinforce how they were being instructed in school.

Conversely, many of today's parents and grandparents were never taught phonics/science of reading, so they are/will be unable to reinforce their students' instruction.

As a result, just as higher education has created a publicly-funded cottage industry around remediation for those scoring less than a 19 on any ACT subject area, so too has K-12 created an entrenched, publicly-funded infrastructure around reading remediation.

Instead of continually kicking the reading can down the road, what if we dedicated the necessary resources to teach it right the first time? What if we made an Arkansas Guarantee.

Every student not precluded by intellectual disability will read at grade level.

Period.

How do we get there - not in ten years or five - but as soon as possible. Here's a path, and we're receptive to other evidence-based solutions.

  • Report cumulative student performance, growth data of teachers from respective preparation colleges, universities, programs
    • Hold those responsible for training accountable
  • Prioritize (teach, grow, reinforce) reading throughout K-12 public education, particularly K-8
  • Illuminate, reward successful districts, charters
  • At the highest level of State Government, speak clearly and decisively to the public school districts and open-enrollment public charter schools of Arkansas that the following is coming, and that they will be best served by voluntarily implementing now what will soon be required by law
    • In 2019-20 (the first school year after the 92nd General Assembly), require that all Arkansas Kindergarten students be instructed in phonics/science of reading and that district/charter resources must be prioritized to ensure that all Kindergarten students are reading at level by the end of the school year. Repeat for each subsequent grade.
    • In 2019-20 (the first school year after the 92nd General Assembly), require that the reading level of all Arkansas Grade 1 through 12 students be assessed and reported, and that immediate, intensive intervention be individually implemented to ensure grade level readiness by:
      • Grades 1 - 3 end of school year
      • Grades 4 - 5 end of elementary school
      • Grades 6 - 7 end of intermediate school/middle school/junior high
      • Grades 9 - 12 end of high school
  • Do not penalize students, families for adults' failures

It really is this simple: If a child does not learn to read, he/she will not read to learn.

The State of Arkansas currently invests approximately $87,100 for each students' K-12 journey. Throw in local and federal sources, and the number is easily $140,000 per student. If our public districts and charters are not guaranteeing the basic building block of education, why do they even exist?

When the Arkansas high school graduation rate is 87%, but 59% of students are not reading ready, we are not graduating students ready for K-12, much less college, career and/or community.

Not reading at grade level is an individual, familial, community and state economic development emergency, and it must be addressed with the utmost urgency.

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The New Segregationists

Posted By Arkansas Learns, Wednesday, September 27, 2017
Updated: Thursday, November 2, 2017

seg·re·ga·tion
seɡrəˈɡāSH(ə)n

noun

  • the separation or isolation of a race, class, or ethnic group by enforced or voluntary residence in a restricted area, by barriers to social intercourse, by separate educational facilities, or by other discriminatory means.

In its opposition to open-enrollment public charter schools and inter-district school choice, the status quo claims both are causing "re-segregation."

Unfortunately for their credibility, the data-driven facts prove just the opposite.

What is emerging, however, is a definition difference between those who believe "desegregation" is the preservation and/or creation of preferred demographic percentages versus those who believe "desegregation" is equal access for all.

What is also evident is that those who are committed to the former, at least in much of Arkansas, only think of diversity in terms of Black and non-Black, not all cultures.

 

Little Rock School District Local/Federal Control Past

The 1989 Desegregation Settlement Agreement provided for the establishment of six Stipulation Magnets in the Little Rock School District:

  • Parkview Arts and Science Magnet High School
  • Horace Mann Arts and Science Magnet Middle School
  • Booker Arts Magnet Elementary School
  • Carver Math and Science Magnet Elementary School
  • Gibbs Magnet Elementary School of Foreign Language and International Studies
  • Williams Traditional Magnet Elementary School

The Stipulation Magnets were originally required to have a student population which was fifty-percent (50%) black and fifty percent (50%) non-black and a prescribed method for allocating magnet seats among the then-three (Little Rock, Pulaski County Special, North Little Rock) school districts.

As a result, because of demand, African-American students were denied entry at far greater numbers than non-black students. Even though empty seats were available, because of racial percentage requirements, empty seats were prioritized over the "over-admission" of African-American students.

It is unclear when the district committed to a gerrymandered, non-contiguous attendance zone encompassing much of Little Rock's affluent neighborhoods and preferential magnet admissions (Gifted & Talented, International Studies) for Central High School. As a result of this and Parkview's 100% preferential magnet admission, Little Rock's remaining three high schools - Fair, Hall, McClellan - have been rendered hyper-segregated, 4%, 5% and 3% White, respectively. By contrast, Central is 29% White, while Parkview is 20%.

 

2014 Desegregation Settlement Agreement

Conditions imposed by then-Pulaski County Special School District Superintendent Jerry Guess and Joshua Intervenors Attorney John Walker in the 2014 Desegregation Settlement Agreement ended the Majority-to-Minority transfers prescribed in the 1989 agreement. As a result, African-American choice into the Little Rock School District dropped 1,259 students between 2013-14 and 2014-15, even though state funding used for the transfers' transportation does not end until the end of this school year.

Further, the Agreement limited Legal Transfers among the three districts to 30 per year. As a result, the whitest district in the county - Pulaski County Special (44%) - denied entry of Little Rock and North Little Rock School District-resident students into the PCSSD. Meanwhile, LRSD is 18% White, while NLRSD is 30%.

 

Little Rock School District State Control Present

In 2017-18, the second year of State intervention, the Little Rock School District had its lowest enrollment gap between African-American and White students on recent record - 10,069. The previous low was 10,770 in 2004-05.

Also in 2016-17, after widening by nine percentage points in the eleven years before State intervention, tor the first time on recent record, the percentage gap between African-American and White students narrowed.

After unsuccessful challenges in both Circuit and U.S. District Courts, LRSD opened Pinnacle View Middle School sixth grade in West Little Rock in 2016-17. Instead of an attendance zone, students were assigned based on zoning of feeder elementary schools - Fulbright, Roberts and Terry. As a result, the school's now 515-student body is the most balanced between Black and White in the district:

  • 2 or More Races: 6 (1%)
  • Asian: 42 (8%)
  • Black: 217 (42%)
  • Hispanic: 24 (5%)
  • Native America/Native Alaskan: 1 (0%)
  • Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander: 1 (0%)
  • White: 224 (43%)

District-wide, Hispanic, Asian and Other now exceed total White enrollment in the Little Rock School District.

 

Open-enrollment Public Charter Schools

Since the year of the first open-enrollment public charter school in the Little Rock School District footprint (2004), African-American students and families have chosen charters at a rate 2.44 times that of White students and families.

1,024 White students attend open-enrollment public charter schools in the Little Rock School district footprint, compared to 2,501 African-American students. The Little Rock charters are a combined 78% minority.

In 2016, charter opponents claimed that the expansions of eStem Public Charter Schools and LISA Academy would accelerate the "re-segregation" of the Little Rock School District.

The following year, LISA Academy opened a 540-student K-6 in West Little Rock. This year and last, 14% of its students are White, 4 points less than the LRSD.

eStem High School opened on the campus of UALR this year. It's 460-student body is 70% minority:

  • 2 or More Races: 18 (3%)
  • Asian: 7 (2%)
  • Black: 261 (57%)
  • Hispanic: 34 (7%)
  • Native America/Native Alaskan: 1 (0%)
  • Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander: 0 (0%)
  • White: 139 (30%)

 

Shannon Hills

The City of Shannon Hills is in Saline County. However, its residents are split between the Pulaski County Special and Bryant School Districts.

In 2004-05, its Landmark Elementary in the PCSSD had 310 students, 155 (50%) of them White. In 2016-17, Landmark had 217 students, 89 (41%) of them White.

Conversely, the elementary school in the Bryant School District - Robert L. Davis - had 507 students in 2004-05, 467 (92%) of them White. In 2016-17, it had 585 students, 349 White (60%).

The 13-year difference: Pulaski County Special School District, which denied inter-district school choice, lost 30% of Landmark's enrollment, while its White enrollment dropped nine percentage points.

Meanwhile, Bryant, which participated in inter-district school choice, increased enrollment by 15% as its White enrollment dropped 32 percentage points, resulting in both more students and more diversity.

 

Allen P. Roberts, PA

Lawyers from the same firm, Allen P. Roberts, PA of Camden, represent six of the seven school districts in Arkansas choosing to claim an exemption from Inter-district School Choice. All of those are in South/Southwest Arkansas.

The firm, as well as the superintendent who hired it, were fired by the Pulaski County Special School District earlier this year. Before that, the district voted unanimously to participate in Inter-district School Choice in 2018-19.

The only exempting district not represented by the firm is the new  Jacksonville/North Pulaski School District, which followed its parent Pulaski County Special School District in claiming an exemption. It is hoped that the district will follow PCSSD's latest lead and fully participate in 2018.

 

El Dorado School District

The El Dorado School District is one of seven school districts in Arkansas choosing to exempt from Inter-district School Choice by claiming one or more conflict(s) with federal order(s).

However, for the past 13 years, El Dorado has accepted 988 Legal Transfers into the district, an average of 76 per year. Unlike Inter-district School Choice, which is open to all, but capped at 3% per year, Legal Transfers require agreement by both the resident and receiving school boards.

Even though the El Dorado School District is 38% African-American, only 56 (5.7%) of the 988 accepted transfers were African-American.

 

Junction City School District

The Junction City School District is one of seven school districts in Arkansas choosing to exempt from Inter-district School Choice by claiming one or more conflict(s) with federal order(s).

And yet, for generations, Junction City has accepted enrollment of Louisiana residents into its district. So, what it denies Arkansas residents, it readily grants Louisiana residents and their accompanying dollars.

 

Texarkana (AR) School District

Texarkana (AR) School District is one of seven school districts in Arkansas choosing to exempt from Inter-district School Choice by claiming one or more conflict(s) with federal order(s).

Texarkana's High School is a Priority School, among the lowest 5% academically performing schools in Arkansas.

It is estimated that 400 to 600 Texarkana (AR) School District residents are misrepresenting their residence or transferring custody/guardianship so their students may enroll in the Texarkana (TX) School District.

 

Garland County

The seven school districts of Garland County are precluded by a U.S. District Judge from participating in Inter-district School Choice. However, under the Court's supervision, the districts still send and receive transfers based on race, a method which has been ruled unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court. Here are the numbers and races of the respective districts' transfers in 2016-17:

District  2 or More Races  Asian  Black Hispanic Native American/
Native Alaskan 
Native Hawaiian/
Pacific Islander 
White  Total 
 Cutter-Morningstar  14  0  2   8  1  1  44  70
 Fountain Lake  6  0  1  7  1  0  50  65
 Hot Springs  4  2  4  13  0  0  93  116
 Jessieville  1  1  3  4  0  0  71  80
 Lake Hamilton  17  0  12  23  2  0  55  109
 Lakeside  33  3  53  67  5  0  176  337
 Mountain Pine  0  0  1  0  0  0  20  21
 TOTAL  75  6  76  122  9  1  509  798

 

What's wrong with this picture? Under the guise of "desegregation," as in El Dorado, far more White students (64% of transfers), both in percentage and numbers, are benefitting from the districts' "pick-and-choose" transfers than African-American students (9.5% of transfers).

A consensus among the districts to settle their federal court issue(s) seems to be emerging.

 

Weighted Lotteries

In the 91st General Assembly, Representative Clarke Tucker (D-District 35) introduced HB 1671, which would have given open-enrollment public charter schools the discretion of weighting admission lotteries to pre-determine their schools' demographics. Currently, all charter admissions are blind - admit all that apply, and if demand exceeds capacity, hold a blind lottery.

Ironically, Representative Tucker's district is home to the two whitest public schools, traditional or charter, in the Little Rock School District's footprint - Forest Park and Jefferson, which are 74% and 72% White, respectively. Admission to those schools are solely determined by student residence, the most segregated aspect of society.

For context, the next highest percentage of White students in the Little Rock School District footprint are Roberts (57%) and Pulaski Heights Elementary (50%).

 

Artificial demographic manipulation has never worked and will never work because preferring one student means disfavoring another. Plus, those of means will always find a way to get their children out of an undesirable situation. Instead of prescribing or preserving demographics du jour, equity of access for all students should be our guide. Here's how:

  • Excellence in every school
  • Minimize impact of traditional school district residence with elementary-only attendance zones
    • Feeding Middle Schools/Jr. Highs
    • Feeding High Schools
  • Open-enrollment intra- and inter-district school choice where capacity
  • Open-enrollment public charter schools
  • Mobility empowered by smart, collaborative transportation

How do we know it will work? The newest school in the Little Rock School District - Pinnacle View Middle School - opened as the most racially balanced school in the district, simply by meeting long pent up demand and replacing an attendance zone with an elementary school feeder pattern.

The newest open-enrollment public charter school in the district - the 540-student LISA Academy-Chenal - opened in West Little Rock with only 14% White students - four points lower than the district.

The public school - traditional or charter - that most closely mirrors the resident demographics of the Little Rock School District is the enrollment-capped, open-enrollment eStem Public Charter Schools. Less than one percent of its downtown campus lives in the same ZIP Code as the school.

 

Denying equal access to students and families in the name of "desegregation" is, at best, intellectually dishonest and morally inconsistent. At worst, it's self-interested and evil.

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Under State's Leadership, 'Re-Segregation' Reversed in Little Rock School District

Posted By Arkansas Learns, Saturday, September 23, 2017
Updated: Thursday, November 2, 2017

In the Saturday, September 23, 2017 Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Rita Sklar of the Arkansas ACLU, repeated what has become a constant talking point of those opposed to both charter schools and the State's intervention in the Little Rock School District.

"Here in Little Rock, the process of re-segregating our classrooms has accelerated since the state takeover of the Little Rock School District in 2015, and new state-initiated and authorized charter schools are being created at a breakneck pace and with a fervor that is obscene."

And yet, no evidence is ever provided regarding the district's "re-segregation" since State control nor the charters' alleged role as accomplices. In fact, the district's decade-long, locally-controlled history of "re-segregation" is conveniently ignored.

The reason no evidence is ever provided is because none exists. In fact, the truth is just the opposite of the status quo's re-segregation fabrication.

Here are the demographic data for the district since the advent of the first charter school in 2004.

  2 or More
Races 
Asian  Black  Hispanic  Native American/
Alaskan 
Native Hawaiian/
Pacific Islander 
White  Total  Total
Black/White
Enrollment
 
Black/White
Enrollment Gap
 
2004-05*  NA  430   16,738  1,226  62  NA  5,968  24,424  22,706  10,770
(74%/26%)
2005-06  NA  399  17,173  1,343  69  NA  6,111  25,095  23,284  11,062
(74%/26%)
2006-07  NA  412  17,432  1,553  76  NA  6,027  25,550  23,459  11,405
(74%/26%)
2007-08  NA  436  17,715  1,733  81  NA  5,773  25,738  23,488  11,942
(75%/25%)
2008-09**  NA  432  16,936  1,865  73  NA  5,354  24,660  22,290  11,582
(76%/24%)
2009-10  NA  450  16,574  1,927  76  NA  5,363  24,380  21,937  11,211
(76%/24%)
2010-11  126  509  16,245  2,174  83  2  5,087  24,226  21,332  11,158
(76%/24%)
2011-12  177  534  16,114  2,322  75  8  4,819  24,049  20,933  11,295
(77%/23%)
2012-13  199  523  15,708  2,540  69  6  4,549  23,594  20,257  11,159
(78%/22%)
2013-14  227  579  15,689  2,728  64  9  4,380  23,676  20,069  11,309
(78%/22%)
2014-15  271  557  15,371  2,925  65  10  4,164  23,363  19,535  11,207
(79%/21%)
2015-16***  272  567  15,070  3,124  55  11  4,065  23,164  19,135  11,005
(79%/21%)
2016-17  285  563  14,603  3,183  57  14  4,054  22,759  18,657  10,549
(78.3%/21.7%)
2017-18  318  595  14,040  3,350  54  10  3,971  22,338  18,011

 10,069
(78%/22%)

TOTAL
LOSS/GAIN
 318
 +165
(+38%)
 -2,698
(-16%)
 +2,124
(+173%)
 -8
(-13%)
 14  -1,997
(-33%)
 -2,086
(-8.5%)
 -4,695
(-21%)
 -701
(+4%/-4%)
BEFORE STATE
CONTROL
LOSS/GAIN

 +271  +127
(+30%)
 -1,367
(-8%)
 +1,699
(+139%)
 +3
(+1%)
 +10  -1,804
(-30%)
 -1,061
(-4%)
 -3,171
(-14%)
 +437
(+5%/-5%)
STATE CONTROL
LOSS/GAIN

 +47
(+17%)
 +38
(+6.8%)
 -1,331
(-8.7%)
 +425
(+14.5%)
 -11
(-17%)
 +0
(+/-0%)
 -193
(-4.6%)
 -1,025
(-4.4%)
 -1,524
(-7.8%)
 -1,138
(-1%/+1%)

* First Year of Charter
** First Year of African-American Majority Board
*** First Year of State Takeover

 

Meanwhile, at the charters...

District/School 2 or More
Races 
Asian  Black  Hispanic  Native American/
Alaskan 
Native Hawaiian/
Pacific Islander 
White  Total
LRSD   318
(1%)
 595
(3%)
 14,040
(63%)
 3,350
(15%)
 54
(.2%)
 10
(.04%)
 3,971
(18%)
 22,338
All Little Rock
Charters*
 133
(3%)
 215
(5%)
 2,501
(53%)
 804
(17%)
 16
(.3%)
 3
(.1%)
 1,024
(22%)
 4,696
eStem  81  45  1,049  147  6  2  638  1,968
LISA Academy Chenal  15  59  274  152  4  0  82  586
LISA Academy 7-8  14  68  148  72  0  0  53  355
LISA Academy High  10  28  193  80  0  0  88  399
Little Rock Prep  0  0  186  24  0  0  3  213
Exalt  2  0  160  204  0  0  9  375
Premier  0  0  108  2  0  0  4  114
SIA Tech  0  1  166  12  0  0  9  188
Covenant Keepers  2  0  48  90  0  0  1  141
Quest  1  14  53  12  2  1  105  188
Rockbridge  8  0  116  9  4  0  32  169

 * The recently approved open-enrollment public charters - ScholarMade (2018), Einstein (2018) and Friendship (2019) will open at 2410 South Battery, 3615 West 25th Street and Southwest Little Rock, respectively.

 

Here are the facts:

  • LRSD lost 2,698 African-American students since first charter in 2004
  • LRSD lost 1,997 White students since first charter in 2004
  • Little Rock open-enrollment public charters gained 2,501 African-American students since beginning
  • Little Rock open-enrollment public charters gained 1,024 White students since beginning
  • LRSD lost 1,367 African-American students (-8%) between first charter and State intervention
  • LRSD lost 1,804 White students (-30%) between first charter and State intervention
  • LRSD lost 1,331 African-American students (-8.7%) since State intervention in 2015
  • LRSD lost 193 White students (-4.6%) since State intervention in 2015
  • West Little Rock's LISA Academy, which was vigorously opposed on grounds of "re-segregation," has 586 students - 82 (14%) White, 4 points less than the LRSD's White enrollment.

Past Thirteen Years - From First Charter to Present (2004 - 2017)

  • African-American students and families are choosing charters at a rate 2.44 times that of White students and families.
  • African-American enrollment in LRSD has decreased every year since 2008, which was also the first school year of a majority African-American school board.
  • White enrollment in LRSD has decreased every year since 2005, three years before the first majority African-American school board.
  • The largest one-year drop in African-American enrollment in LRSD was -779 between 2007-08 and 2008-09, the year of the first majority African-American board. That was also the largest one-year drop in White enrollment (-419).
  • The three smallest annual drops in White enrollment in LRSD were the three years of State intervention, -99 in 2015-16, and -11 in 2016-17, and -83 in 2017-18.
  • Hispanic and Other (Asian, Native American/Alaskan, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander) enrollment (4,009) now exceed White enrollment (3,971).
  • The growing demographics in the LRSD are Hispanic (+173%), 2 or More Races (+152%), and Asian (+38%).
  • The declining demographics in the LRSD are African-American (-2,698/-16%) and White enrollment (-1,997/-33%).

Before State Intervention (2004 - 2015)

  • Prior to State intervention, LRSD lost White students at a rate 1.32 higher than that of African-American students.
  • Prior to State intervention, the district averaged losing 180 White students a year.
  • In the ten years before State intervention, the enrollment gap between African-American and White students increased from 10,770 to 11,207 (74%/26% to 79/21%).

After State Intervention (2015 - 2017)

  • After State intervention, LRSD lost African-American students at a rate nearly seven times higher than that of White students.
  • After State intervention, the district averaged losing 64 White students a year.
  • In the three years of State intervention, the African-American and White enrollment gap decreased 1,138 students (-1%/+1%)
  • In 2016-17 (Superintendent Mike Poore's first year), for the first time in thirteen years, both the total number and percentage enrollment gap between African-American and White students decreased (-456, -1%/+1%)
  • In 2017-18 (Superintendent Mike Poore's second year), the district had the lowest total number enrollment gap between African-American and White students (10,069). The previous low was 10,770 in 2004-05.

It would behoove those who value their credibility, and the journalists who quote them, to check the facts before simply parroting the party line.

We welcome correction of any inaccuracies.

Source: https://adedata.arkansas.gov/statewide/Districts/EnrollmentByRace.aspx

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A Place Called Hope? Not if You're Trapped in or Denied Entry to Schools

Posted By Arkansas Learns, Tuesday, September 12, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Whatever happened to "A Place Called Hope?"

It's been replaced by a community so lacking in confidence in its public schools that its leaders trap those residents without the means for private, home school, or moving, and denies entry to anyone who would like to attend, but doesn't live in the district. In short, Hope has given up on individual, familial and community economic development.

Only seven school districts in Arkansas, save the seven precluded by a federal judge in Garland County, do not participate in and benefit from inter-district school choice. Six of those seven are in Southwest Arkansas. And all of those are represented by the same Allen P. Roberts PA attorneys. This is the same firm which was recently fired by the Pulaski County Special School District, which by the way, will participate in School Choice in 2018.

Here's what Hope claims are its conflicting federal court orders

If exemption weren't bad enough, the Hope School Board is now following its lawyers to U.S. District Court in an attempt to make "permanent" its exemption from state law. In other words, in the name of desegregation, it's attempting to build a wall around its district and not let anyone in or out.

Attached are the Motion for Declaratory Judgement to Enjoin Transfer and Brief in Support of Declaratory Judgment, both filed September 7, 2017 in the U.S. District Court, Western District of Arkansas, Texarkana Division (U.S. District Judge Hickey).

It's past time for Hope's business, civic and parent leaders, as well as its distinguished natives, to step up and insist its school board withdraw these motions and join the rest of Arkansas in putting the best interests of students and families over the self interests of the status quo.

 Attached Files:

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In El Dorado and Other Exempting Districts, Racial Percentages Matter More Than Equal Access

Posted By Arkansas Learns, Monday, September 4, 2017
Updated: Monday, November 6, 2017
The El Dorado School District, one of only seven Arkansas school districts exempting from the state's law on Inter-district School Choice, has a dirty little secret.

It's doing School Choice - the pick-and-choose kind - via legal transfers, which require agreement of the resident and receiving districts. As a result, here are the demographics of the non-resident students "picked and chosen" for admission to the El Dorado School District over the past fourteen years:
  • 2004-05: 67 (4 Black; No other races reported)
  • 2005-06: 90 (6 Black; No other races reported)
  • 2006-07: 90 (1 Black; No other races reported)
  • 2007-08: 90 (1 Black; No other races reported)
  • 2008-09: 79 (2 Black; No other races reported)
  • 2009-10: 103 (92 White, 7 Black, 4 Other)
  • 2010-11: 101 (88 White, 7 Black, 6 Other)
  • 2011-12: 76 (68 White. 4 Black, 4 Other)
  • 2012-13: 60 (53 White, 4 Black, 3 Other)
  • 2013-14: 68 (56 White, 7 Black, 5 Other)
  • 2014-15: 61 (48 White, 6 Black, 7 Other)
  • 2015-16: 55 (45 White, 4 Black, 6 Other)
  • 2016-17: 48 (40 White, 3 Black, 5 Other)
  • 2017-18: 42 (37 White, 3 Black, 2 Other)
  • 14-YEAR TOTAL: 1,030 (59 Black - 5.7%)
  • 9-YEAR TOTAL: 614 (527 White - 86%, 45 Black - 7%, 42 Other - 7%)
Get the picture? In the name of desegregation, El Dorado is selectively enrolling non-resident White students at a rate nearly 12 to 1 over non-resident African-American students. As a result, in a district that is 38% White and 49% Black, at least 86% of transfers are White, while only 5.7% are Black.
 
The only reason to claim an exemption from Inter-district School Choice is to trap some students and keep others out. The numbers prove who El Dorado is keeping out.
 
A percentage of the El Dorado Promise is available to non-resident students who transfer into the district by the ninth grade. It is unfathomable that only 59 African-American students have sought transfer into the district over the past fourteen years.
 
Meanwhile, non-resident employees of the district may choice in their students, regardless of race. And, resident employees of other districts may choice out their students, also regardless of race.
 
El Dorado, like six of the seven other exempting districts in Arkansas, is represented by the same law firm, Allen P. Roberts, P.A. of Camden. Pulaski County Special School District (PCSSD), which will fully participate in and benefit from Choice in 2018, fired the firm along with its Choice-hating superintendent earlier this year.
 
In 2014, the former PCSSD superintendent, the Roberts firm, and Joshua Intervenors attorney John Walker were responsible for a one-year drop in African-American Choice into the Little Rock School District of 1,259 students.
 
El Dorado has so much going for it. It's a shame and disgrace to let the school board, superintendent, and their attorneys trap its students simply because of residence and be the sole gatekeepers as to who gets in or out of the district.

The El Dorado School District board, superintendent, and their enabling attorneys and U.S. District Judge must do better. Brown v. Board of Education was about ensuring equity of access for all, not propping up arbitrarily determined artificial racial balances.
 
Here are the only districts in Arkansas exempting from School Choice, hyperlinked to their excuses, as well as their percentages of White students:

Many Arkansas school districts have a lower percentage of White students than the exempting districts, but are fully participating in and benefiting from Inter-district School Choice, including Little Rock (18% White - same as Hope). If Little Rock, with its tortured past in the federal courts, which is bordered to the east, south and west by a district (Pulaski County Special) which is 44% White, can do it, so too can El Dorado and its fellow clients of Allen P. Roberts, P.A.

The choice really is this simple: either parents know what's best for students, or the government (i.e. school board) does. Parents, citizens and the business and civic leadership of the exempting districts must insist that their respective boards choose choice and follow Arkansas law. It's an individual, familial and community economic development imperative.

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When Exactly Were LRSD's Glory Days?

Posted By Arkansas Learns, Friday, September 1, 2017
Updated: Monday, November 6, 2017

For those who believe "local control" to be the panacea for all that ails the Little Rock School District, please share the glory days year or year(s) you believe is/are closest to what the district could/should be. Here's a start on a list of accomplishments of the respective boards and their superintendents.

The only accomplishment the district's website history lists after 2002 was being declared unitary by the U.S. District Court in February of 2007.

[Work in Progress]

2004

  • Katherine Mitchell
  • Robert Daugherty
  • Bryan Day
  • Baker Kurrus
  • Larry Berkley
  • Tony Rose
  • Sue Strickland
  • Roy Brooks, Superintendent
    • State Championship - Football - Central
    • State Championship - Girls Track and Field - McClellan
    • State Championship - Girls Tennis - Central
    • State Championship - Girls Basketball - Parkview

2005

  • Katherine Mitchell
  • Robert Daugherty
  • Bryan Day
  • Baker Kurrus
  • Larry Berkley
  • Tony Rose
  • Sue Strickland
  • Roy Brooks, Superintendent
    • State Championship - Boys Tennis - Central
    • State Championship - Girls Basketball - Parkview

2006

  • Katherine Mitchell
  • Robert Daugherty
  • Melanie Fox
  • Baker Kurrus
  • Larry Berkley
  • Charles Armstrong
  • Dianne Curry
  • Roy Brooks, Superintendent
    • State Championship - Boys Tennis - Central
    • State Championship - Boys Basketball - Parkview

2007

  • Katherine Mitchell
  • Robert Daugherty
  • Melanie Fox
  • Baker Kurrus
  • Larry Berkley
  • Charles Armstrong
  • Dianne Curry
  • Roy Brooks, Superintendent
    • District declared unitary by U.S. District Court
    • Highest enrollment (25,738) on recent record
    • State Championship - Quiz Bowl - Parkview
    • State Championship - Boys Tennis - Central
    • State Championship - Girls Basketball - Parkview

2008

  • Katherine Mitchell
  • Robert Daugherty
  • Melanie Fox
  • Baker Kurrus
  • Jody Carriero
  • Charles Armstrong
  • Dianne Curry
  • Linda Watson, Superintendent
    • State Championship - Quiz Bowl - Central
    • State Championship - Quiz Bowl - Parkview
    • State Championship - Boys Tennis - Central
    • State Championship - Boys Basketball - Hall

2009

  • Katherine Mitchell
  • Robert Daugherty
  • Melanie Fox
  • Baker Kurrus
  • Jody Carriero
  • Charles Armstrong
  • Dianne Curry
  • Linda Watson, Superintendent
    • State Championship - Boys Tennis - Central

2010

  • Katherine Mitchell
  • Mike Nellums
  • Melanie Fox
  • Greg Adams
  • Jody Carriero
  • Tommy Branch, Jr.
  • Dianne Curry
  • Linda Watson/Morris Holmes, Superintendent
    • Roberts Elementary opens as largest elementary in district, first school west of I-430 since 1978
    • State Championship - Quiz Bowl - Parkview
    • State Championship - Girls Tennis - Parkview
    • State Championship - Boys Basketball - Hall
    • State Championship - Boys Basketball - McClellan

2011

  • Norma Johnson
  • Mike Nellums
  • Melanie Fox
  • Greg Adams
  • Jody Carriero
  • Tommy Branch, Jr.
  • Dianne Curry
  • Morris Holmes, Superintendent
    • Highest revenue on record ($348,859,027)
    • State Championship - Quiz Bowl - Parkview
    • State Championship - Girls Tennis - Central
    • State Championship - Boys Basketball - Hall
    • State Championship - Boys Basketball - Parkview

2012

  • Norma Johnson
  • Mike Nellums
  • Leslie Fisken
  • Greg Adams
  • Jody Carriero
  • Tommy Branch, Jr.
  • Dianne Curry
  • Morris Holmes/Marvin Burton, Superintendent
    • State Championship - Girls Basketball - Parkview
    • State Championship - Boys Basketball - Hall
    • State Championship - Boys Basketball - Parkview

2013

  • Norma Johnson
  • C.E. McAdoo
  • Leslie Fisken
  • Greg Adams
  • Jody Carriero
  • Tara Shephard
  • Dianne Curry
  • Marvin Burton/Dexter Suggs, Superintendent
    • Desegregation Settlement Agreement approved
    • Reward School (Top 10% Performing in Arkansas) - Forest Park Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 10% Performing in Arkansas) - Jefferson Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 10% Performing in Arkansas) - Roberts Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 10% Performing in Arkansas) - Williams Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 20% Performing in Arkansas) - Terry Elementary
    • State Championship - Girls Basketball - Hall
    • State Championship - Boys Basketball - Hall

2014

  • Joy Springer
  • C.E. McAdoo
  • Leslie Fisken
  • Greg Adams
  • Jim Ross
  • Tara Shephard
  • Dianne Curry
  • Dexter Suggs, Superintendent
    • District ends exemption from inter-district School Choice
    • Forest Heights STEM Academy opens
    • A School (300 of 300; Tied for 1st in Arkansas) - Forest Park Elementary
    • A School (290 of 300; Tied for 11th in Arkansas) - Terry Elementary
    • A School (289 of 300; Tied for 12th in Arkansas) - Roberts Elementary
    • A School (277 of 300; Tied for 24th in Arkansas) - Carver Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 10% Performing in Arkansas) - Forest Park Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 10% Performing in Arkansas) - Gibbs Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 10% Performing in Arkansas) - Roberts Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 10% Performing in Arkansas) - Terry Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 10% Performing in Arkansas) - Williams Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 20% Performing in Arkansas) - Jefferson Elementary
    • State Championship - Girls Track and Field - Parkview
    • State Championship - Boys Tennis - Central

2015

  • Board Removed
  • Arkansas Department of Education Commissioner Tony Wood Assumes Responsibilities
  • Arkansas Department of Education Commissioner Johnny Key Succeeds Tony Wood
  • Dexter Suggs, Superintendent
  • Baker Kurrus succeeds Dexter Suggs
    • Cuts licensed staff (which includes administrators) by 166 (22%)
    • A School (285 of 300; 2nd in Arkansas) - Forest Park Elementary
    • B School (269 of 300; Tied for 7th in Arkansas) - Roberts Elementary
    • B School (265 of 300; Tied for 10th in Arkansas) - Parkview High School
    • Reward School (Top 5% Performing in Arkansas) - Forest Park Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 5% Performing in Arkansas) - Gibbs Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 5% Performing in Arkansas) - Jefferson Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 5% Performing in Arkansas) - Roberts Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 5% Performing in Arkansas) - Williams Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 6-10% Performing in Arkansas) - Forest Heights STEM Academy K-8
    • Reward School (Top 5% Growth in Arkansas) - Forest Park Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 5% Growth in Arkansas) - Cloverdale Middle
    • Reward School (Top 5% Growth in Arkansas) - Forest Heights STEM Academy K-8
    • Reward School (Top 5% Growth in Arkansas) - Forest Park Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 5% Growth in Arkansas) - Gibbs Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 5% Growth in Arkansas) - Mabelvale Middle
    • Reward School (Top 5% Growth in Arkansas) - Mann Middle
    • Reward School (Top 5% Growth in Arkansas) - Pulaski Heights Middle
    • Reward School (Top 5% Growth in Arkansas) - Roberts Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 5% Growth in Arkansas) - Williams Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 6-10% Growth in Arkansas) - Henderson Middle
    • Reward School (Top 6-10% Growth in Arkansas) - Jefferson Elementary
    • State Championship - Boys Basketball - McClellan

2016

  • Arkansas Department of Education Commissioner Johnny Key
  • Baker Kurrus, Superintendent
    • Pinnacle View Middle School opens temporary sixth grade
    • Baseline Elementary removed from Academic Distress
    • State Championship - Boys Basketball - Parkview
  • Mike Poore succeeds Baker Kurrus
    • Reward School (Top 5% Performance in Arkansas) - Fair Park Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 5% Performance in Arkansas) - Roberts Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 6-10% Performance in Arkansas) - Forest Heights STEM Academy K-8
    • Reward School (Top 6-10% Performance in Arkansas) - Gibbs Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 5% Growth in Arkansas) - Fair Park Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 5% Growth in Arkansas) - Roberts Elementary
    • Reward School (Top 6-10% Growth in Arkansas) - Gibbs Elementary
    • State Championship - Boys Basketball - Parkview

2017

  • Arkansas Department of Education Commissioner Johnny Key
  • Michael Poore, Superintendent
    • Fair, McClellan High Schools removed from Academic Distress
    • Low-enrollment Franklin, Wilson, Hamilton, Woodruff closed
    • Pinnacle View Middle School opens as largest building in district
    • District one of twelve in Arkansas to improve in all grades on ACT Aspire
    • Second lien bonds approved to build, refurbish student facilities
    • Ground broken for Little Rock Southwest High School
    • U.S. Department of Education names Don R. Roberts Elementary National Blue Ribbon School

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While Status Quo Cries 'Racists,' Its Fight Against School Choice Hurts African-Americans Most

Posted By Arkansas Learns, Wednesday, August 30, 2017
Updated: Thursday, August 31, 2017

"When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser." - Socrates

The status quo is quick to label most anything School Choice as "racist." In fact, almost everything with which the status quo disagrees, particularly in regard to the Little Rock School District, receives the dreaded "R" label.

And yet, the status quo's tacit acceptance of Jerry Guess/John Walker-imposed conditions in the 2014 Desegregation Settlement Agreement and its ongoing irrational fight against anything charter has had a far greater detrimental impact on African-American students and families than their White counterparts.

What about Hispanic (14% of LRSD) or Other (4%) students? In the status quo's LRSD, all that matters is Black (64%) and White (18%).

So, here are the facts regarding...

African-American School Choice in Little Rock

School Year Non-resident Black
Students Choosing LRSD
Black Students
as % of LRSD Choice
Black Students
Choosing Charters
Black Students
as % of Charter Choice
2004-05 58 95% 85 52%
2005-06 58 97% 72 24%
2006-07 43 100% 101 28%
2007-08 43 91% 342 52%
2008-09 420 91% 981 57%
2009-10 1,197 76% 1,046 55%
2010-11 1,399 76% 1,524 59%
2011-12 1,474 78% 1,581 55%
2012-13 1,419 78% 1,646 55%
2013-14 1,373 80% 1,606 54%
2014-15 114 63% 1,787 53%
2015-16 113 65% 1,998 53%
2016-17 125 65% 2,243 53%

 

Get the picture? Limitations on School Choice have had and continue to have a devastating impact on African-American students, both in numbers and percentages.

What happened in 2014-15? In the Desegregation Settlement Agreement, John Walker and Jerry Guess imposed a 30-student annual limit on School Choice from and to the Pulaski County Special School District. North Little Rock, Little Rock, and the State were apparently so anxious to complete a settlement, they agreed. So, the attorney supposedly representing the best interests of African-American students and the superintendent of the whitest district in the county ended inter-district School Choice, the beneficiaries of which were mostly African-Americans and the Little Rock School District.

In just one year, African-American choice into the Little Rock School District dropped 1,259 students. In status quo terms, that's $8,435,300 in annual State foundation funding. And yet, there was not a peep out of the status quo. There will be those who claim that Choice was ended because the State no longer paid for it. But the State's non-restricted desegregation payments to the districts don't stop until the end of this school year, four years after Choice was halted.

So, let's have a real conversation about race.

  • Total African-American Choice enrollment in Pulaski County South of the Arkansas River (2,368) would rank as the 50th largest school district in Arkansas (out of 269 districts, charters).
  • Total African-American Charter enrollment in Little Rock (2,243) would rank as the 53rd largest school district in Arkansas
  • In past dozen years, African-American enrollment in Little Rock's open-enrollment public charter schools has grown 2,639%
  • In past dozen years, White enrollment in Little Rock's open-enrollment public charter schools has grown 1,465%
  • In past dozen years, African-American enrollment growth in open-enrollment public charter schools has outpaced White growth nearly two to one 
  • Only 26% (50) of non-resident inter-district School Choice students in the Little Rock School District are White
  • Only 23% (982) of open-enrollment public charter school students in Little Rock are White
  • According to the 2010 census, upon which the latest LRSD board zones were drawn:
    • Total LRSD Population - 178,391
    • White LRSD Population - 84,513 (47%)
    • Black LRSD Population - 78,724 (44%)
    • Hispanic LRSD Population - 12,551 (7%)
    • Other LRSD Population - 2,603 (1.5%)
  • School-age population in Pulaski County South of Arkansas River:
    • Total: 40,609
    • LRSD (56%): 22,759 (18% White)
    • Private (20%): 8,184 (Demographics Unavailable)
    • PCSSD (12%): 4,770 (44% White)
    • Charter (10%): 4,252 (23% White)
    • Home School (2%): 644 (Demographics Unavailable)

The latest unanimously approved open-enrollment public charter applications for Little Rock are projected to open at:

When the status quo fights inter-district school choice and open-enrollment public charter schools under the banner of fighting racism, they are actually fighting choices made by African-American students and families, those long trapped by the tyranny of Choice-exempting school districts and residence-based attendance zones.

Sources:
https://adedatabeta.arkansas.gov
http://www.officeforeducationpolicy.org/arkansas-schools-data-demographics

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13,633 Arkansas Students Choose District Schools Outside of Residence

Posted By Arkansas Learns, Friday, August 25, 2017
Updated: Friday, August 25, 2017

With 13,633 choosing schools in districts other than their own in 2016-17, the state's greatest beneficiaries of inter-district school ranged from North to South, East to West, rural to urban.

District  School Choice Students 
 Greene Co. Tech  537
 Southside (Independence Co.)  474
 Paragould  431
 Bauxite  405
 Alma  349
 West Memphis  338
 Lakeside (Garland Co.)  337
 Benton  318
 North Little Rock  285
 Pottsville  269
 West Fork  239
 White Hall  220
 Poyen  210
 Watson Chapel  207
 Little Rock  192
 Harmony Grove (Benton Co.)  187
 Greenwood  182
 Valley View  181
 Bryant  167
 Elkins  161
 Mountain Home  158
 Jonesboro  155
 Lawrence Co.  155
 Palestine-Wheatley  153
 Van Buren  150
 Perryville  149
 Brookland  143
 Hoxie  143
 Pocahontas  142
 Nettleton  131
 Farmington  128
 Greenbrier  128
 Pea Ridge  122
 Hot Springs  116
 Magnet Cove  106
 Cave City  101


Sadly, the residents of eight Arkansas school districts were denied choice by their boards. Six of those districts were counseled by the same law firm - Alan P. Roberts PA of Camden. The newly elected board of the Pulaski County Special School District fired the firm earlier this year and will fully participate in and benefit from inter-district school beginning in 2018. It remains to be seen if the Jacksonville North Pulaski School District will follow PCSSD's lead, as it did on exemption. Here are the exempting districts, linked to their anachronistic and non-conflicting excuses for exemption.

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How Springdale Starts Teachers Over $11,500 More Than LRSD

Posted By Arkansas Learns, Friday, August 25, 2017
Updated: Friday, August 25, 2017

Springdale, the district closest in enrollment to Little Rock, has the highest teacher salaries in the state. The Little Rock School District...doesn't.

District
(2015-16)
Base Teacher Pay
(BA: 0 Years)
Base Teacher Pay
(MA: 0 Years) 
Base Teacher Pay
(Top of Schedule) 
Average Teacher Pay 
 Springdale  $46,816 (1st)  $49,340 (1st)  $75,316 (1st)  $59,143 (1st)
 LRSD  $35,232 (63rd)  $40,550 (37th)  $68,634 (10th)  $57,265 (2nd)


Here's why.

Year  District  Enrollment  Classified  Licensed (Administrators)  Teachers  Total Personnel  Personnel per Pupil 
 2016-17   LRSD  22,759  1,498  587  1,658  3,743  6.08
 2016-17  Springdale  21,527  1,096  299  1,432  2,827  7.61
               
 2015-16  LRSD  23,164  1,623  598  1,677  3,898  5.94
 2015-16  Springdale  21,260  1,070  300  1,370  2,740  7.76
               
 2014-15  LRSD  23,363  1,652  764  1,939  4,355  5.36
 2014-15  Springdale  21,120  1,054  324  1,559  2,937  7.19
               
 2013-14  LRSD  23,676  1,762  767  1,774  4,303  5.50
 2013-14  Springdale  20,542  1,022  300  1,397  2,719  7.55


Even though Springdale has only 1,232 students less than Little Rock, it has 916 fewer employees. That gives Springdale over one-and-a-half employees less per pupil than Little Rock. And its licensed employees, which includes administrators, are nearly half of Little Rock's total.

Since State intervention, however, Little Rock is making progress, dropping licensed employees/administrators 177 in just two years and increasing its personnel per pupil number by nearly .72 employees.

It should be noted that Springdale does not participate in collective bargaining. Little Rock does, for both teachers and classified staff. Why is that significant? When union dues are the same ($720 per year for teachers), regardless of income, the union benefits from volume of employees, with no incentive to raise pay. Increasing teacher pay may only come from reduction in volume of employees, and that does not benefit the union.

There is an alternative and immediate way to give Little Rock teachers a $522 raise. For comparable benefits at a fraction ($198) of LREA dues ($720), LRSD teachers could follow the lead of hundreds of their Springdale colleagues and join the non-union Arkansas State Teachers Association (ASTA). But teachers will have to contact ASTA on their own, as the union is, inexplicably, given a monopoly on access to LRSD teachers. Compare benefits here:

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Biggest Charter School Lies Debunked

Posted By Arkansas Learns, Thursday, August 24, 2017
Updated: Friday, September 1, 2017

Several big whoppers are regularly told regarding open-enrollment public charter schools. The conversation generally goes like this, "I'm not against charter schools, but...

School/District  Enrollment  SPED  FRL  White  Hispanic Black  Other  Minority 
 LRSD  22,567  12%  71%  18%  14%  64%  4%  82%
 All LR Charters  4,244  7% (295)  50% (2,106) 23% (982)  15% (647)  53% (2,253)  8% (354)  77% (3,270)
 eStem  1,462

8% (117)

 30% (439)
 40% (585)  6% (88)  47% (687)  6% (88)  60% (877)
 LISA Academy Chenal  356  5% (18)  35% (125)  20% (71)  16% (57)  38% (145)  26% (93)  84% (299)
 LISA Academy 7-8  540  4% (22)  57% (307)  14% (77)  21% (113)  49% (265)  16% (86)  86% (464)
 LISA Academy High  365  6% (22)  42% (153)  24% (88)  17% (62)  47% (172)  12% (44)  76% (277)
 LR Prep  411  9% (37)  84% (345)  1% (4)  10% (41)  89% (366)  0% (0)  99% (407)
 Exalt  307  4% (12)  96% (295)  2% (6)  51% (157)  45% (138)  1% (3)  98% (300)
 Premier  109  11% (12)  23% (25)  9% (10)  3% (3)  88% (96)  0% (0)  91% (99)
 SIA Tech  171  3% (5)  82% (140)  3% (5)  5% (9)  91% (156)  1% (2)  97% (166)
 Covenant Keepers  180  4% (7)  94% (169)  0% (0)  53% (95)  46% (83)  1% (2)  100% (180)
 Quest  192  17% (32)  12% (23)  60% (115)  7% (13)  22% (42)  11% (21)  40% (77)
 Rockbridge  151  7% (11)  56% (85)  18% (27)  6% (9)  68% (103)  9% (14)  82% (124)

 

Have other concerns regarding open-enrollment public charter schools in Arkansas? Share them, and we'll share the facts.

 

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